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BLEEDING FREE DOCUMENTARY

A documentary about period poverty and period dignity.

Presented by Bleeding Saor Collective from Edinburgh Napier University.


Join us on May 20th for the premiere of Bleeding Free at 7pm (GMT- London time) by registering on Crowdcast.

Get ready !

BLEEDING FREE PREMIERE

Register on Crowdcast to join for the premiere of Bleeding Free Documentary

Thursday 20th May, 7pm

The Bleeding Free documentary


Bleeding Free is a documentary about period poverty, period dignity and menstrual education. It tells the story of girls and women around the world: those who, throughout their life, suffered from social stigma against their bodies and especially on the topic of menstruation.

Through the collaboration of Edinburgh Napier University students, this documentary aims to champion menstrual myths and break this “silence of menstruation” in order to create a long lasting impact for young people and their communities.

2021-05-20T19:00:00

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Premiere. 7pm.

‘Bleedin’ Saor’ Student collaborative design new dispenser for free sanitary products. As part of their third year placement, Bleedin’ Saor’s product design students – Sam Calder, Hannah Stevens and Brogan Henderson – have been working with the University’s Property and Facilities’ team to roll out an initial, temporary design for a dispenser that will house free sanitary products across all three campuses.

Let’s talk, period.


Inequality in access to sanitary products and menstrual education leave girls and women all around the world socially disadvantaged. Period poverty occurs when someone cannot afford sanitary products because of financial constraints. In 2020, in the UK, 30% of girls couldn’t afford their own period products.

A common reaction to learning the facts that surrounds this problem is surprise and often disbelief. To put this stats into perspective, it would be as if in your classroom, around a dozen of girls could not afford their own menstrual products. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of research to erase destructive scepticism.

Help us start a conversation and circulate positive awareness about menstruation !

Want to Donate ?

Today, support and help us provide women and girls in Scotland and Uganda!

With your donation, you will ease the profound impact period poverty has on girls’ education, their health and their wellbeing.

Why donate ?

The Bloody Big Brunch at Merchiston. Held to raise awareness of and raise funds to alleviate period poverty. The overall campaign name is Bleedin’ Saor (A bloody big project). MSP Aileen Campbell (in dark sweater) from the SNP was a special guest.
Sewing girls at Tumaini Uganda.
  • According to thinktank THINX, 80% of teenagers feel there is a negative association with periods, that they are gross or unsanitary.
  • In the UK, in 2017, 10% of girls could not afford their own pads. In 2020, the impact of COVID-19 increased this percentage with now 30% of girls unable to afford menstrual products during the national lockdown
  • According to Plan International UK’s research, 49% of girls have missed an entire day of school because of their period.

By donating, you are supporting women on low-incomes with a weigh off their shoulders in the form of free period products !

  • Around the world, menstrual policies moved forward to legislate the free provision of sanitary products. Well done: Kenya, UK, Japan, Australia, France !
  • Thanks to period organisations and charities, conversations dismantling stigma and taboo surrounding periods are being incorporated into schools curriculum

Find out more about Bleedin Saor‘s social campaign on awareness surrounding periods.

All donations will go directly to help food banks around Edinburgh area and to our partners in Uganda : Irise Uganda, Girl Up and Days for Girls International.

Join us on May 20th for the premiere of Bleeding Free at 7pm on Crowdcast.


The Bleeding Saor Collective

Who we are

Bleeding Saor is a student collaborative founded at Edinburgh Napier University. Created in 2018, the collective aims to raise awareness about period poverty and end the stigma surrounding ‘that time of the month’.

‘Bleedin’ Saor’ Student collaborative design new dispenser for free sanitary products. As part of their third year placement, Bleedin’ Saor’s product design students –(LtoR) Hannah Stevens, Sam Calder and Brogan Henderson – have been working with the University’s Property and Facilities’ team to roll out an initial, temporary design for a dispenser that will house free sanitary products across all three campuses.

A design team at Napier University, created dispensers to provide free period products on campus and organised the Bloody Big Brunch at Merchiston Campus in 2019.

The documentary

As part of the Bleeding Free documentary project, a team of Edinburgh Napier University film students and staff travelled around Scotland and to Uganda to show the different efforts that were undertaken in each country to tackle period poverty and the collaboration between organisations and NGOs of both nations [filmed before COVID-19].

Bloody Big Brunch

An initiative originated from by creative marketing and PR agency Wire, along with social enterprise Hey Girls, the Bloody Big Brunch is a national campaign that sees brunch events hosted across the country to raise awareness of period poverty.

The Bloody Big Brunch at Merchiston. Held to raise awareness of and raise funds to alleviate period pverty. The overall campaign name is Bleedin’ Saor (A bloody big project).

In march, 2019, the Bloody Big Brunch was hosted by Napier University where guests paid for their drinks by donating period products.


Our partners



Our partners and contributors helped us understand the actions that are being taken to educate women and challenge the myths that surround menstruation. The collaboration between Scotland and Uganda was a way to compare and contrast the situation and the work done in both countries.

GIRL UP

Based in Kampala, Girl Up Initiative is one of the few organisation involved in menstrual management across Uganda.

Girl Up executive director & co-founder Monica Nyiraguhabwa.

In Bleeding Free, executive director & co-founder Monica Nyiraguhabwa guides the audience through the female struggle in a country that sees periods as a big taboo.  The stories of Ugandan women who suffer from period poverty and of the people fighting to end it lead the narrative of this part of the documentary.

IRISE UGANDA

From Jinja, a village in the East of Kampala, Irise International works with schools and communities on menstrual health education.

Irise Uganda Programme Manager Agnes Akullo.

In Bleeding Free, Programme Manager Agnes Akullo shares the way tradition, religion and harmful social norms have consistently stifled conversation around periods.

HEY GIRLS

Hey Girls is a Scottish charity founded in 2017. Based on a Buy One Give One business model, Hey Girls provides menstrual products for those in need but also works on spreading positive menstrual education.

Hey Girls founder Celia Hodson.

In Bleeding Free, its founder Celia Hodson talks about the shame surrounding period poverty and the difficulties she met when addressing those issues with concrete actions.


Behind the scenes


Join us on May 20th for the premiere of Bleeding Free at 7pm on Crowdcast.


In Edinburgh, Scotland


In Uganda

Period dignity for all isn’t radical or extreme. It’s simply the right thing to do.

– Monica Lennon, Member of the Scottish Parliament.

Credits from monicalennonmsp.org

Join us on May 20th for the premiere of Bleeding Free at 7pm on Crowdcast.

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